SINOPHILE
Submitted to fyeahcutemoths as a response to this post on the relationship between death and moths in folklore……
Noctuid Moth (Erebus macrops, Catocalinae)  In Chinese folklore, legend has it that moths are human souls transformed. During Qing Ming (or Tomb Sweeping Festival) the souls will take the form of flying insects like butterflies and moths, to pay the living a visit.  The hills of Pu’er are dotted with hundreds of graves, some in congregations, others you will come across out of nowhere as individuals. Until recently, it was permitted (or at least unchallenged) to choose a family burial site on a hillside with a view at your discretion. Most of these tombs comprise a monumental headstone and altar and are tended annually at Qing Ming and/or on the anniversary of the deceased’s passing - the grave is cleaned, vegetation cleared, food offerings made and gaudy reflective decorations to deter evil spirits are erected.  Here is my “supernatural” story……  On one of the walking tracks I traverse regularly, is a pair of well-tended graves; one is a single, the other contains a couple. Last summer, on each occasion I passed, these mighty Erebus moths (they are as big as my hand) were in attendance. Always one on the single grave and two on the couple’s grave (pictured), tucked away in a dark corner under the tiled eaves of the tombstones. ( I am not kidding you).   I always did my best not to disturb them as this is one “myth” I have come to respect. Occasionally though they flew away as I passed, yet obviously they returned. Presumably over the span of the summer months, these could not have been the same moths as they were invariably in pristine condition.  But regardless, it is sobering to think that the souls of the deceased are amongst us, and not too daunting to think they take the form of a noble moth.  by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr. Pu’er, Yunnan, China  See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Submitted to fyeahcutemoths as a response to this post on the relationship between death and moths in folklore……

Noctuid Moth (Erebus macrops, Catocalinae)

In Chinese folklore, legend has it that moths are human souls transformed. During Qing Ming (or Tomb Sweeping Festival) the souls will take the form of flying insects like butterflies and moths, to pay the living a visit.

The hills of Pu’er are dotted with hundreds of graves, some in congregations, others you will come across out of nowhere as individuals. Until recently, it was permitted (or at least unchallenged) to choose a family burial site on a hillside with a view at your discretion. Most of these tombs comprise a monumental headstone and altar and are tended annually at Qing Ming and/or on the anniversary of the deceased’s passing - the grave is cleaned, vegetation cleared, food offerings made and gaudy reflective decorations to deter evil spirits are erected.

Here is my “supernatural” story……
On one of the walking tracks I traverse regularly, is a pair of well-tended graves; one is a single, the other contains a couple. Last summer, on each occasion I passed, these mighty Erebus moths (they are as big as my hand) were in attendance. Always one on the single grave and two on the couple’s grave (pictured), tucked away in a dark corner under the tiled eaves of the tombstones. ( I am not kidding you).

Noctuid Moths (Erebus macrops, Catocalinae)

I always did my best not to disturb them as this is one “myth” I have come to respect. Occasionally though they flew away as I passed, yet obviously they returned. Presumably over the span of the summer months, these could not have been the same moths as they were invariably in pristine condition.

But regardless, it is sobering to think that the souls of the deceased are amongst us, and not too daunting to think they take the form of a noble moth.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

DRAGON HEAD RAISING DAY: IT’S HAIRCUT TIME

On the second day of the second month (of the lunar calendar), the dragon raises its head” - so goes the Chinese idiom, 二月二,龙抬头 (èr yuè èr, lóng táitóu).
This year’s Dragon Head Raising Day fell on March 2, 2014.

The most well-known tradition on this day is the cutting of hair and millions of people nationwide will get their haircut on what must be a great day for barbers. On this day, if you cut your hair it is believed you will have good fortune for the rest of the year. In addition, Chinese refrain from getting haircuts during the first lunar month of the year as it is believed that 正月剃头死舅舅 (if you cut your hair in the first month, your uncle will die)–bad news for kindly uncles everywhere.

Read more HERE…..

Oriental Garden Lizard or Changeable Lizard (Calotes versicolor, Agamidae)

The Oriental Garden Lizard, Eastern Garden Lizard or Changeable Lizard is an agamid lizard found widely distributed in Asia. It has also been introduced in many other parts of the world.

During the breeding season, the male’s head and shoulders turns bright orange to crimson and his throat black. Males also turn red-headed after a successful battle with rivals. Thus their other gruesome name of “Bloodsucker Lizard” although they don’t actually suck anybody’s blood. Both males and females have a crest from the head to nearly the tail, hence their other common name “Crested Tree Lizard”.

Oriental Garden Lizard or Changeable Lizard (Calotes versicolor, Agamidae)

They eat mainly insects and small vertebrates, including rodents and other lizards.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See other posts in this LIZARDS of CHINA series HERE.

See more images from China on my Flickr site HERE…..

Chinese Families and Their Possessions


A fascinating set of photos by Huang Qingjun.

Nearly 20% of the world’s people live in China. That fact makes the country an incredibly diverse place. 

Huang Qingjun travels the expansive nation photographing families alongside all of their possessions. 

via Smile in Your Face

Just twenty-five years of change in Shanghai. 

Shanghai Development. 
Almost hard to believe Shanghai’s skyline used to be so low. Entirely unrecognizable.

Just twenty-five years of change in Shanghai. 

Shanghai Development.
Almost hard to believe Shanghai’s skyline used to be so low. Entirely unrecognizable.

Makeup Art.
These Chinese New Year celebration pieces by 'Red' Hong Yi were completed using only makeup products!

Lion City. 
An amazing ancient Chinese city now completed submerged under the clear waters of Qiandao Lake.

Lost Underwater Lion City: Rediscovery of China’s ‘Atlantis

Qiandao Lake is a man-made lake located in Chun’an County, China, where archeologists have discovered in 2001 ruins of an underwater city. The city is at a depth of 26-40 meters and was named “Lion City”. There would have been 290,000 people living in this city during more than 1300 years.

Shanghai From A Crane.
Crane operator by day, aerial photographer by day too.

Just glancing at the epic aerial shots above, you’d think they were captured by a professional photographer. 

In fact, these amazing photos were taken by Wei Gensheng, a crane operator currently working in Shanghai. 

Crane Operator Takes Stunning Aerial Photos of Shanghai

via SLR Lounge

sinobug:Chinese Insects and Spiders

A whole heap more Chinese Caterpillars






Click images to see identification (linked to their respective Flickr pages).
See others in the series of Chinese Caterpillars tumblr posts HERE. 

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..
sinobug:
Chinese Insects and Spiders

A whole heap more

Chinese Caterpillars

Chalcosiine Day-flying Moth Caterpillar (Chalcosiinae, Zygaenidae)

Chalcosiine Day-Flying Moth Caterpillar (Cyclosia sp., Zygaenidae)

Lasiocampid Moth Caterpillar

Caterpillar

Mid Instar Awl Caterpillar (Coeliadinae, Hesperiidae)

Click images to see identification (linked to their respective Flickr pages).

See others in the series of Chinese Caterpillars tumblr posts HERE.

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..
There’s something on my knee……
Giant False Leaf Katydid (Pseudophyllus titan, Pseudophyllinae, Tettigoniidae)

If you have ever travelled or lived in China, you quickly observe that crowds form at the drop of a hat, whether it be to watch a game of chequers, minor domestic arguments, traffic accidents…and for foreigners. This happens in the big cities as much as it does in the more remote provinces, but when you are one of just a handful of 外国人(foreigners) in a third- or fourth-tier Chinese city and you are wielding a big camera with a flash diffuser AND you have China’s largest Orthopteran, P.titan (which very few Chinese people would be even aware exists), performing a threat display on your knee in the local park, the exponentially growing band of onlookers stands and stares in silent and, I will admit, unsettling curiosity.

So picture, if you will, the unseen scene in this image. I politely indicated that the crowd move aside so that I didn’t have them in the background of this shot. Behind and to the sides of me however, is a throng maybe two or three deep slowly creeping closer and closer as new arrivals at the rear of the pack push and strain to see what the commotion is. 

I should have put my hat on the ground and collected some change…..
See more images of Pseudophyllus titan in my Flickr photostream HERE.

by itchydogimages on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more images from China on my Flickr site HERE…..

There’s something on my knee……

Giant False Leaf Katydid (Pseudophyllus titan, Pseudophyllinae, Tettigoniidae)

If you have ever travelled or lived in China, you quickly observe that crowds form at the drop of a hat, whether it be to watch a game of chequers, minor domestic arguments, traffic accidents…and for foreigners. This happens in the big cities as much as it does in the more remote provinces, but when you are one of just a handful of 外国人(foreigners) in a third- or fourth-tier Chinese city and you are wielding a big camera with a flash diffuser AND you have China’s largest Orthopteran, P.titan (which very few Chinese people would be even aware exists), performing a threat display on your knee in the local park, the exponentially growing band of onlookers stands and stares in silent and, I will admit, unsettling curiosity.

So picture, if you will, the unseen scene in this image. I politely indicated that the crowd move aside so that I didn’t have them in the background of this shot. Behind and to the sides of me however, is a throng maybe two or three deep slowly creeping closer and closer as new arrivals at the rear of the pack push and strain to see what the commotion is.

I should have put my hat on the ground and collected some change…..

See more images of Pseudophyllus titan in my Flickr photostream HERE.

by itchydogimages on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more images from China on my Flickr site HERE…..

ohmyasian:


Artist and photographer Colette Fu documents her trip through China’s Yunnan province through pop-up books, effectively capturing the dynamism, vibrance, and color of the region.
Find out more on her website!
sinobug:Chinese Insects and Spiders

…..and more"TRUE" BUGS of China

Members of the Hemipteran suborder Heteroptera are known as "true bugs".  They have very distinctive front wings, called hemelytra, in which the basal half is leathery and the apical half is membranous.  At rest, these wings cross over one another to lie flat along the insect’s back.  These insects also have elongate, piercing-sucking mouthparts in which the mandibles and maxillae are long and thread-like, interlocking with one another to form a flexible feeding tube (proboscis) containing both a food channel and a salivary channel.

The immature stages of the heteropteran true bugs (nymphs) structurally resemble the adult form but are always lacking wings.

True bugs are generally well-known and include the stink bugs, assassin bugs, shield bugs, squash bugs and the aquatic water boatmen.






Click images to see identification (linked to their respective Flickr pages).
See others in the series of "TRUE" BUGS of China tumblr posts HERE. 

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..
sinobug:
Chinese Insects and Spiders

…..and more

"TRUE" BUGS of China

Members of the Hemipteran suborder Heteroptera are known as "true bugs". They have very distinctive front wings, called hemelytra, in which the basal half is leathery and the apical half is membranous. At rest, these wings cross over one another to lie flat along the insect’s back. These insects also have elongate, piercing-sucking mouthparts in which the mandibles and maxillae are long and thread-like, interlocking with one another to form a flexible feeding tube (proboscis) containing both a food channel and a salivary channel.

The immature stages of the heteropteran true bugs (nymphs) structurally resemble the adult form but are always lacking wings.

True bugs are generally well-known and include the stink bugs, assassin bugs, shield bugs, squash bugs and the aquatic water boatmen.

Coreid Leaf-footed Bug (Coreidae)

Assassin Bug Nymph (Velinus annulatus, Reduviidae)

Coreid Leaf-footed Bug or Squash Bug (Derepteryx sp., Coreidae)

Horned Shield Bug (Gonopsis coccinea, Pentatomidae)

Giant Shield Bug (Asiarcha angulosa, Tessaratomidae)

Click images to see identification (linked to their respective Flickr pages).

See others in the series of "TRUE" BUGS of China tumblr posts HERE.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..
theworldofchinese:

CHINESE LABOUR CORPS
In the tiny French commune of Noyellessur-Mer, facing the English Channel, a stone Chinese archway rises incongruously at a cemetery entrance. Inside, over 800 graves are marked with Chinese names, birthplaces, death-dates between 1916 and 1920, and Biblical phrases in Chinese and English.
The dead of Noyelles came from the Chinese Labour Corps (CLC), a force of 100,000 Chinese who, from 1916 onward, dug many of the trenches that criss-crossed war-torn France. The British-led CLC, and another 40,000 men working for the French, carved out defences, built barricades, fixed railways, and mended telegraph wire. The Chinese Labour Corps was the creation of wily Chinese statesman Liang Shiyi (梁士诒), once the technophile Minister of Railways under the Qing Dynasty (1616-1911). It was an attempt to get on what he saw as the winning side of the war and ultimately better China’s place. Germany, like the other Great Powers, held considerable concessions in China, and siding with the Allies, even if only quietly at first, would position China to reclaim those colonies at war’s end.
It was appropriate enough, then, that the majority of the laborers he negotiated to send to France were from Shandong, where the German concessions were sited. The British and French officials involved in negotiating the contracts were looking for strong Northerners, and the men were said to be often “six feet tall”, a striking height at the time.
The legal status of the laborers was somewhat dubious; as, officially, a non-belligerent China could not supply military aid to the Allies without violating its neutrality. The Germans protested against the creation of the labour corps to the Chinese government, which replied by specifying that this was a purely civilian deal, handled through a conveniently created “private company”, the Huimin Company, and if this supply of labor happened to be used for martial purposes, that was nothing to do with them. That the Huimin Company had been brought into existence by Liang Shiyi purely for this purpose was not allowed to trouble this legal fiction. The laborers themselves have left little record. Almost entirely illiterate, their histories were set down by others, whether the British offi cers who dealt with them or the educated Chinese who accompanied them as translators. Farmers and migrants from rural villages, their transition into the war was also a transition into modernity.
As they entered “the sausage machine” of processing, their traditional queues were chopped off; they were washed, fingerprinted, and given a number,not a name. In his book, Strangers on the Western Front, Guoqi Xu demonstrated why this mechanistic process was made necessary; in the book, a British offi cer is recorded saying, “The man didn’t know his own name. If you questioned him, he’d say ‘Well, I come from the Wong family village, so my name is probably Wong.’ You’d say, ‘All right, well what is your personal name?’ and he’d grin and say ‘Wong’. We’d say, ‘Well, what are you called at home?’ and he’d say ‘Well, I’m known as Number Five, or Little Dog, or Big Nose.’
But the conditions were praised by the workers, who enjoyed the food, the hot baths with soap, and the clean housing…
Continue Reading Here……

theworldofchinese:

CHINESE LABOUR CORPS

In the tiny French commune of Noyellessur-Mer, facing the English Channel, a stone Chinese archway rises incongruously at a cemetery entrance. Inside, over 800 graves are marked with Chinese names, birthplaces, death-dates between 1916 and 1920, and Biblical phrases in Chinese and English.

The dead of Noyelles came from the Chinese Labour Corps (CLC), a force of 100,000 Chinese who, from 1916 onward, dug many of the trenches that criss-crossed war-torn France. The British-led CLC, and another 40,000 men working for the French, carved out defences, built barricades, fixed railways, and mended telegraph wire. The Chinese Labour Corps was the creation of wily Chinese statesman Liang Shiyi (梁士诒), once the technophile Minister of Railways under the Qing Dynasty (1616-1911). It was an attempt to get on what he saw as the winning side of the war and ultimately better China’s place. Germany, like the other Great Powers, held considerable concessions in China, and siding with the Allies, even if only quietly at first, would position China to reclaim those colonies at war’s end.

It was appropriate enough, then, that the majority of the laborers he negotiated to send to France were from Shandong, where the German concessions were sited. The British and French officials involved in negotiating the contracts were looking for strong Northerners, and the men were said to be often “six feet tall”, a striking height at the time.

The legal status of the laborers was somewhat dubious; as, officially, a non-belligerent China could not supply military aid to the Allies without violating its neutrality. The Germans protested against the creation of the labour corps to the Chinese government, which replied by specifying that this was a purely civilian deal, handled through a conveniently created “private company”, the Huimin Company, and if this supply of labor happened to be used for martial purposes, that was nothing to do with them. That the Huimin Company had been brought into existence by Liang Shiyi purely for this purpose was not allowed to trouble this legal fiction. The laborers themselves have left little record. Almost entirely illiterate, their histories were set down by others, whether the British offi cers who dealt with them or the educated Chinese who accompanied them as translators. Farmers and migrants from rural villages, their transition into the war was also a transition into modernity.

As they entered “the sausage machine” of processing, their traditional queues were chopped off; they were washed, fingerprinted, and given a number,not a name. In his book, Strangers on the Western Front, Guoqi Xu demonstrated why this mechanistic process was made necessary; in the book, a British offi cer is recorded saying, “The man didn’t know his own name. If you questioned him, he’d say ‘Well, I come from the Wong family village, so my name is probably Wong.’ You’d say, ‘All right, well what is your personal name?’ and he’d grin and say ‘Wong’. We’d say, ‘Well, what are you called at home?’ and he’d say ‘Well, I’m known as Number Five, or Little Dog, or Big Nose.’

But the conditions were praised by the workers, who enjoyed the food, the hot baths with soap, and the clean housing…

Continue Reading Here……

sinobug:Chinese Insects and Spiders

….more       Butterflies of China






Click images to see identification (linked to their respective Flickr pages).
See my other Butterflies of China tumblr posts HERE. 

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..
sinobug:
Chinese Insects and Spiders

….more

Butterflies of China

Small Yellow Sailor (Neptis miah, Nymphalidae)

Common Palmfly (Elymnias hypermnestra, Satyrinae), male

Bushbrown Butterfly (Mycalesis sp., Satyrinae), possibly M. gotama (wet season form)

Three-Spot Grass Yellow (Eurema blanda, Pieridae)

Common Sailor (Neptis hylas, Nymphalidae)

Click images to see identification (linked to their respective Flickr pages).

See my other Butterflies of China tumblr posts HERE.

See more Chinese butterflies on my Flickr site HERE…..

cultureincart:

Villager Sun Xuetang makes steamed buns with patterns in the Zhuqiao Town, Laizhou City, east #China’s Shandong Province, Jan. 15, 2014. Steamed bun with colourful patterns, listed as an intangible heritage of Shandong, is a traditional staple food during the Spring Festival in Jiaodong.

cultureincart